pietro.delsante's blog

In-depth Interview: Lukas Rist

Lukas Rist (@glaslos) is a software engineer with Blue Coat Norway where he develops behavioral malware analysis systems. In his spare time, he creates web application and ICS/SCADA honeypots and botnet monitoring tools under the umbrella of the Honeynet Project. He recently developed an interest in industrial security and automated SQL statement classification. He will be giving a live demo on Conpot at the upcoming The Honeynet Project workshop in Warsaw, on May 13. Here are his answers to our questions: keep reading to get to know a bit more about him.

In-depth Interview: Maximilian Hils

Maximilian Hils (@maximilianhils) is a student of Information Systems at WWU Münster, Germany. He is one of the two core developers of mitmproxy, on which he started to work on during his Honeynet Google Summer of Code project in 2012. In his spare time, he develops web applications and slays SSL dragons whereever he finds them. Recently, he developed an interest in Cloud Storage Security and Security Usability. He will be giving a live demo about "slaying SSL dragons with mitmproxy" at the upcoming annual The Honeynet Project workshop in Warsaw on May 13. Here you have a nice way to discover something more about him and his work.

In-depth Interview: Sebastian Pöplau

Sebastian Pöplau (@poeplau) is the lead developer of the Ghost USB Honeypot, a detection system for USB malware. He is an IT security enthusiast and a full member of the Honeynet Project. He has studied in Bonn, Germany, and Santa Barbara, CA, and works with Lastline. He will be giving a live demo about code-loading techniques on Android during the annual The Honeynet Project Workshop in Warsaw on May 12. Here you have a good chance to get to know him a bit more.

Malware-serving theaters for your android phones - Part 1

Some nights ago I was heading to a local theater with some (non-nerd) friends. We did not recall very well the address, so I brought out my phone (LG Nexus 4 with Android 4.4.2 and Google Chrome) and googled for it. I found the theater's official site and started looking for the contact info, when Chrome suddenly opened a popup window pointing me to a Russian web site (novostivkontakte.ru) urging me to update my Flash Player. I laughed loudly and showed them to my (again, totally non-nerd) friends saying that the site had been owned. One of them went on and opened the site with her own phone (Samsung Galaxy S Advance with Android 4.4.1 and the default Android WebKit browser). To make a long story short, after a few instants her phone was downloading a file without even asking her for confirmation. So: Chrome on my Nexus 4 was using social engineering to have me click on a link and manually download the file; Android's WebKit on her Galaxy S Advance was instead downloading the file straight away: interesting! However, we were a bit late and we had to run for the comedy, so I did not even bother to see what the heck she had downloaded, I only made sure she hadn't opened it. I thought it was just the usual exploit kit trying to infect PCs by serving fake Flash Player updates, seen tons of those. While waiting for the comedy to begin, I quickly submitted the compromised site to three different services, the first three ones that came to my mind: HoneyProxy Client, Wepawet and Unmask Parasites, then turned off my phone and enjoyed the show.

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