gsoc

dpkt v2.0

What is dpkt?

dpkt is a Python library that helps with "fast, simple packet creation/parsing, with definitions for the basic TCP/IP protocols". It supports a lot of protocols (currently about 63) and has been increasingly used in a lot of network security projects. It is 44x faster than Scapy2, and 5x faster than Impacket3. With Scapy no longer in development, dpkt is the only network creation/parsing library for Python that is active. Read more »

Rumal, a web GUI for Thug

As you may know, Thug is a handy tool for studying exploit kits, as it emulates a real browser complete of a set of plugins like Adobe Reader, Flash and Java. When you feed Thug with the URL of a suspicious web page, it “crawls” it and starts fetching and executing any internal or external JavaScript, following redirects and downloading files just like a browser would do. When Thug encounters some files it cannot analyze by itself (like Flash, Java and PDF), it passes them to external tools. Thug’s results are then collected in a variety of formats, with the default one being a set of collections inside a MongoDB database. Thug works very well but the output can be challenging to navigate, the result often being the ability to only check if the exploit kit’s payload (e.g. an *.exe file) has been downloaded: if not, one may think that the URL is not malicious, or maybe that the exploit kit is dead. That’s where a web GUI would come handy, and that’s exactly what Thug’s Rumal was born for: there’s plenty of information that can be extracted from Thug’s output and that can help a correct analysis to determine the maliciousness of a web page.
 
Rumal was developed by Tarun Kumar during the Google Summer of Code 2015 program, and its goal is to provide a web GUI for Thug. Read more »

Google Summer of Code 2016

Although it is still winter in much of the northern hemisphere, for students and open source software developers, the gradually lengthing days mean that spring will soon be with us - and of course that means another chance to potentially get involved in Google Summer of Code (GSoC). Read more »

Adding a scoring system in peepdf

peepdf is a Python tool to explore PDF files in order to find out if the file can be harmful or not. The aim of this tool is to provide all the necessary components that a security researcher could need in a PDF analysis without using 3 or 4 tools to make all the tasks. With peepdf it's possible to see all the objects in the document showing the suspicious elements, supports the most used filters and encodings, it can parse different versions of a file, object streams and encrypted files. With the installation of PyV8 and Pylibemu it provides Javascript and shellcode analysis wrappers too. Apart of this it is able to create new PDF files, modify existing ones and obfuscate them.
 
In addition to providing the tools for analyzing PDF documents, we also wanted to provide some indication about how likely it is that a given PDF file is malicious. Adding such a scoring system in peepdf was one of the projects of Honeynet Google Summer of Code (GSoC) 2015 program, and the student Rohit Dua did a great job.
 
The scoring system has the goal of giving valuable advice about the maliciousness of the PDF file that’s being analyzed. The first step to accomplish this task is identifying the elements which permit to distinguish if a PDF file is malicious or not, like Javascript code, lonely objects, huge gaps between objects, detected vulnerabilities, etc. The next step is calculating a score out of these elements and test it with a large collection of malicious and not malicious PDF files in order to tweak it. Read more »

mitmproxy: HTTP/2 Support and GSoC 2016

HTTP2 Support for mitmproxy
We are happy to announce the immediate availability of mitmproxy 0.16! As a major new feature, Thomas Kriechbaumer – who joined us as a Google Summer of Code (GSoC) Student last year – contributed a brand new HTTP/2 implementation built on top of hyper-h2. HTTP/2 requests now blend into the mitmproxy UI just like regular HTTP 1 requests, making mitmproxy the first interactive HTTPS proxy with HTTP/2 support! All HTTP/2 features from RFC7540 are supported - including PUSH_PROMISE, RST_STREAM, and as many concurrent streams as you want. We are super excited about the improvements Thomas is bringing us here and we encourage you to try them out. To make a transition as seamless as possible, HTTP/2 needs to be enabled manually for now by passing --http2 to mitmproxy. We plan to remove this requirement with one of the next releases. For a full list of changes, take a look at the changelog posted below!

Google Summer of Code 2016

2012 was a big year for me - being only just out of my freshman year, Honeynet accepted my application as a GSoC Student and I got introduced to the world of free and open-source software development and started contributing to mitmproxy. Long story short, I think this program is one of the major reasons why I am now writing this blog post as one of mitmproxy’s core contributors. Last year, I was in the fortunate position to mentor a student myself - we’re super happy that not only Thomas’ project was a great success, but we also gained a very strong new mitmproxy contributor who is contributing well beyond his GSoC.
I am very happy to announce that we are applying under the umbrella of Honeynet as a GSoC Organization this year again. The last six years’ projects have generated long-lasting successes at Honeynet, so we can’t wait to get in touch with students this year again!
  Read more »

ARTDroid: an easy-to-use framework for hooking under ART

During Google Summer of Code 2015, in the Honeynet Project open-source org, Valerio Costamagna and Cong Zheng (mentor) worked on ARTDroid, an easy-to-use framework for hooking virtual-method under latest Android runtime (ART). Read more »

Honeynet Project Accepted for Google Summer of Code 2015

After a tense few days of waiting, which is always the most stressful part of GSoC for mentoring organizations and org admins, 19:00 UTC today was the moment of truth when some lucky orgs found out that they were accepted for GSoC 2015, and other orgs sadly discovered that they would not be taking part. Read more »

Google Summer of Code 2015

With winter in the northern hemisphere beginning to turn into spring, it is once again time to think about summer. And of course, for many open source organizations, that means Google Summer of Code (GSoC).
  Read more »

GSoC 2014 Mentoring Organization Applications

Over the past five years, The Honeynet Project has been had the pleasure of mentoring over 70 lucky bachelors, masters and PhD students from all over the world through Google Summer of Code (GSoC), Google's ongoing programme of support for international students working on free open source software (FOSS). Together we have worked on a large number of information security tools, including some that have gone on to be the leading examples of tools in their chosen field. Read more »

GSoC2013 Blog Online

To have a better visibility of this years GSoC projects we have created a blog for the students and their mentors. This blog is the place where students should post weekly updates about their progress. It is also the place where students and mentors can share their findings and experiences about and during the GSoC projects as they happen. The first updates have already started to drip in and it is getting interesting.

A hot summer, cool drinks and happy coding to all the participants.

http://gsoc2013.honeynet.org

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