A new and improved version of Rumal

Thug is a client honeypot that emulates a real web browser, fetches and executes any internal or external JavaScript, follows all redirects, downloadable files just like any browser would do, and collects the results in a mongodb collection. The purpose of this tool is to study, analyse and locate exploit kits and malicious websites. Thug’s analysis can be difficult to navigate or understand and this is where Rumal comes in. Rumal’s function is to be Thug’s GUI, providing users with trees, graphs, maps, tables and intuitive representations of Thug’s data. Read more »

Rumal, a web GUI for Thug

As you may know, Thug is a handy tool for studying exploit kits, as it emulates a real browser complete of a set of plugins like Adobe Reader, Flash and Java. When you feed Thug with the URL of a suspicious web page, it “crawls” it and starts fetching and executing any internal or external JavaScript, following redirects and downloading files just like a browser would do. When Thug encounters some files it cannot analyze by itself (like Flash, Java and PDF), it passes them to external tools. Thug’s results are then collected in a variety of formats, with the default one being a set of collections inside a MongoDB database. Thug works very well but the output can be challenging to navigate, the result often being the ability to only check if the exploit kit’s payload (e.g. an *.exe file) has been downloaded: if not, one may think that the URL is not malicious, or maybe that the exploit kit is dead. That’s where a web GUI would come handy, and that’s exactly what Thug’s Rumal was born for: there’s plenty of information that can be extracted from Thug’s output and that can help a correct analysis to determine the maliciousness of a web page.
Rumal was developed by Tarun Kumar during the Google Summer of Code 2015 program, and its goal is to provide a web GUI for Thug. Read more »

Thug and the art of web client tracking inspection

A few months ago I read the paper "Technical analysis of client identification mechanisms" [1]. The paper is really interesting and it is really worth investing your time and reading. Just a brief excerpt from the abstract: Read more »

Thug 0.6 released!

Thug 0.6 was released just a few hours ago. The most important change introduced during the 0.5 branch was a complete redesign of the logging infrastructure which is now completely modular. This makes adding (or removing) new logging modules extremely easy. Read more »

Vagrant configuration for Thug honeyclient

Vagrant and Docker and wonderful tools that enable security practitioners to easily dive into the DevOps world and use them for InfoSec projects. Continuing from the previous blog post Thug in 5 minutes, here is a Vagrant configuration to setup Thug honeyclient. Read more »

Thug 0.5 and KYT paper

Thug 0.4.0 was released on June, 8th 2012 and a huge number of really important features were added since then. During the last two years I had a lot of fun thinking and designing the future of the project and I'm really proud of what Thug is now. I have to thank a lot of persons who contributed with their suggestions, ideas, bug reports and sometimes patches. You know who you are. Really thanks! Read more »

Thug in 5 minutes

Ever wanted to run up a quick instance of Thug on a couple of malicious web sites or try it out but lacked the sys op knowledge or time to install it? Here is the opportunity. Thanks to Docker you can run Thug up in a matter of minutes. Jose Nazario and me have created two docker images which are in the Docker Hub ready to run.

So this is how to do it: Read more »

Is Android malware served in theatres more sophisticated?

Pietro wrote a nice post about him finding Android malware while visiting the theatre. Thanks to Thug (thank you Angelo) and HoneyProxy, he was able to get some interesting details about their infrastructure. I was curious what kind of malware you find in a theatre, so I quickly looked at one of the samples that he mentioned: f6ad9ced69913916038f5bb94433848d. Read more »

Malware-serving theaters for your android phones - Part 1

Some nights ago I was heading to a local theater with some (non-nerd) friends. We did not recall very well the address, so I brought out my phone (LG Nexus 4 with Android 4.4.2 and Google Chrome) and googled for it. I found the theater's official site and started looking for the contact info, when Chrome suddenly opened a popup window pointing me to a Russian web site ( urging me to update my Flash Player. I laughed loudly and showed them to my (again, totally non-nerd) friends saying that the site had been owned. One of them went on and opened the site with her own phone (Samsung Galaxy S Advance with Android 4.4.1 and the default Android WebKit browser). To make a long story short, after a few instants her phone was downloading a file without even asking her for confirmation. So: Chrome on my Nexus 4 was using social engineering to have me click on a link and manually download the file; Android's WebKit on her Galaxy S Advance was instead downloading the file straight away: interesting! However, we were a bit late and we had to run for the comedy, so I did not even bother to see what the heck she had downloaded, I only made sure she hadn't opened it. I thought it was just the usual exploit kit trying to infect PCs by serving fake Flash Player updates, seen tons of those. While waiting for the comedy to begin, I quickly submitted the compromised site to three different services, the first three ones that came to my mind: HoneyProxy Client, Wepawet and Unmask Parasites, then turned off my phone and enjoyed the show. Read more »

Thug: 1000 commits, 1000 thanks

Two years are passed from the first commit and taking a look at the number of committed patches I realized that right now the patch number 1000 was committed. Let me say it's really impressive realizing it. In the last two years I had a lot of fun thinking and designing the future of this project and I'm really proud of what Thug turned to be. I have to thank a lot of persons who contributed with their suggestions, ideas, bug reports and sometimes patches. You know who you are. Really thanks! Read more »

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